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Brush Traction

In 1865, Henry Hughes, a timber merchant engineer, began building horse-drawn tramcars and railway rolling stock at the Falcon Works in Loughborough. His first company was known as the Hughes's Locomotive & Tramway Engine Works Ltd. It appears that he began producing steam locomotives about 1867 for the Paris Exhibition. His main business, however, was tram engines, which were lightweight steam engines (usually with condensers) and drew passenger cars, made possible by the Tramways Act 1870. Among these was "The Pioneer" for the Swansea and Mumbles Railway. Amongst the first steam locomotives built there was "Belmont", which ran on the Snailbeach District Railways, and three 2 ft 3 in (686 mm) gauge 0-4-0STs for the Corris Railway supplied in 1878. In 1881 the company ran into legal problems and in 1882 it was in receivership. In 1882 the company reformed as the Falcon Engine & Car Works Ltd. Production included tank locomotives for Ireland, Spain and the Azores, some subcontracted from other firms, such as Kerr Stuart. In 1889 the assets were taken over by the Anglo-American Brush Electric Light Corporation, which had been set up as the British arm of Charles Francis Brush's Brush Electric Company in America. It then became known as the Brush Electrical Engineering Company. In all, about 250 steam locomotives were built in addition to the tram engines, but this production finished after WW1. Being close to Derby, after WW2 the company retained its contacts with the railway and in 1947 joined with W. G. Bagnall to produce diesel locomotives. In 1951, the company Brush Bagnall Traction Limited was formed. When British Railways began to replace its fleet of steam engines, Brush entered the market for main line diesel-electric locomotives. In 1957 it and Brush Electrical Machines were bought up by Hawker Siddeley to become the Brush Electrical Engineering Company Limited. As part of Hawker Siddeley Electric Power Group it then passed to BTR plc and became Brush Traction. It is now part of FKI Energy Technologies (owned, since 2008, by Melrose plc). The locomotive works is still occupied by the Brush Traction Company and is in use for the building, overhaul and repair of locomotives.
Locomotive production for Britain:
Class 31 "Brush Type 2" mixed-traffic diesel locomotive
Class 47 "Brush Type 4" mixed-traffic diesel locomotive (manufacture shared with BR)
Class 53 "Falcon" prototype diesel locomotive
Class 57 re-engineered diesel locomotive (rebuilt from Class 47)
Class 60 heavy freight diesel locomotive
Class 89 prototype electric locomotive
Class 92 dual-voltage electric locomotive
It also manufactured the Eurotunnel Class 9 electric locomotives operated by Eurotunnel through the Channel Tunnel.
Locomotive production for export:
800 bhp A1A-A1A main line diesel-electric locomotives for Ceylon in 1952 (Sri Lanka Railways M1)
1000 bhp Bo-Bo diesel-electric locomotives for Sri Lanka in 1981 (the M7 class)
1730 bhp Co-Co narrow gauge diesel-electric locomotives for Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1963
Various Bo-Bo diesel electric freight locomotives to Cuba, Tanzania, Gabon, Morocco
Battery electric locomotives to Hong Kong
EF class heavy freight electric locomotive (New Zealand Railways)
Class 18 shunter locomotives for Malayan Railways in 1978
Brush was also a major supplier of traction equipment to rapid transit systems, in particular London Underground and Docklands Light Railway in the UK, and to Canada and Taiwan. Traction equipment was also supplied to British Rail for various Electric Multiple Unit trains, the Class 43 HST diesel locomotive, similar equipment also being supplied to Comeng Australia in 1979, and the Class 56 and 58 Co-Co freight locomotives.
DRS 47805 DRS 47805 seen at Gresty Bridge open day on 18/08/12
DRS 57302 DRS 57302 seen at Gresty Bridge open day on 18/08/12
2 x 47's 47813/853 pull into platform one with the late running Statesman Pullman from Lincoln,the destinatio...
47813/853 Nice shot of 47813/853 at rest
47813, Solent, and 47853 Cab to cab shot of DRS locos,very smart tuen out taken on 9-7-13
Brush locomotives at CLJ WCRC 47s 245/237 haul the Mondays only ECS working from Bristol Kingsland Rd to Southall; the stock ...
57006 Taken August 2009 at the Barrow Hill Diesel Gala Photo courtesy of Mike Digby
57006 again Taken August 2009 at the Barrow Hill Diesel Gala Photo courtesy of Mike Digby
[email protected]! 47245 leads BR Standard Pacific 70013 through Clapham Junction on 19-8-13 with the MO Bristol Kingsl...
31106 in the east Date and location unknown but certainly before 2009 and somewhere in the eastern region. 31106 ...
31 106 at Halton (Runcorn) on 22nd August 2013 31 106 at Halton (Runcorn) on 22nd August 2013 working test train.
31465 31465 at probably Ipswich in 2009 ish - in Network Rail livery Photo courtesy of Mike Digby

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